Wing Chun Training for Simple, Effective and Practical Self Defense: The PHYSICAL Aspect

 

Wing Chun full contact training
Putting the work in at a demonstration of Wing Chun, self-defense and Chinese sanshou (full contact kickboxing) on a sweltering July day. Can you tell I’m channeling some “inner aggression” due to the triple digit heat and damn near 100% humidity? Good, I wasn’t trying to hide it.

The Physical factor is the most-often focused on aspect of self-defense and any system or style of martial arts.

Many might read the previous sentence and think to themselves, “no shit!” I agree that it sounds so obvious it’s insulting but just work with me for a second.

It is obvious that physical techniques are going to form the largest component of training, as one obviously needs to learn specific techniques and be able to execute them effectively. That’s like going to handyman school and learning how to hang a shelf by watching a power-point but not picking up a hammer or actually changing the head of a drill.

I am not implying that the Physical aspect of self-defense training is the least important – quite the contrary. What I am saying is that the Physical aspect of training is all too often done incorrectly or, at the very least, much less effectively than it could be.  At the end of the day, repetition really is the mother of skill – so long as the repetitions are done correctly. with the proper mindset and mentality and in the proper scenario or situation for self-defense and personal protection. Continue reading

How To Choose A Wing Chun Instructor: 3 Key Questions To Ask Yourself (& 3 Misconceptions To Avoid Like The Plague)

“When the student is ready, the teacher will appear.

When the student is truly ready…the teacher will disappear.”

-Lao Tzu

After a training session with 2 of my instructors and close friends: Senior Instructor Ken Lee (left) and my Sifu, Philip Ng. It was only after I had begun my training with the Ng Family Chinese Martial Arts Association that I could fully appreciate the weight and power of the quote stated above, as my martial journey took me down several roads (none of which I regret) to lead me to the style and school which truly put me on the correct path for me.

I am a fan of quotes and I’ve always like that one but it was not until I begin my journey of training in true Wing Chun purely for self-defense and combat skill proficiency that that quote took on a much deeper and profound significance for me.

The Most Difficult Aspect of Wing Chun Training

The most difficult part of Wing Chun training, I submit to you, is not in the hours and hours of dedicated, difficult and at times seemingly fruitless training.  It is not the facing of one’s fears and mental barriers, it is not the fear of contact or being hit and it is not developing skill through repetition. 

The most difficult part of Wing Chun training is finding a true instructor; someone who can, as Bruce Lee once famously said, act as “…a finger pointing a way to the moon,” guiding you along the way to discover the truths of the Wing Chun system for yourself and showing you how to unlock your true potential.

Continue reading

Silence is Golden: The Wing Chun Process Of Cultivating Increased Functionality, Effectiveness and Fighting Skill

Hear that? Me either. And that, my friends, is a beautiful thing.

In both Wing Chun and in my personal fitness regimen, I prefer to train in silence.  Always have, always will. Just give me a space with no distractions where I can tune out the outside world and tune in to what I’m doing and I’m set.

Know Thyself

I’m not against music when teaching class, hitting pads or the heavy bag and sparring – I actually prefer and find music to be much more enjoyable and useful in this context – but for private solo training, I have found that Continue reading

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A WORD OF WARNING: I tend to speak and write how I think, so some of what I say may come across as insensitive, rough around the edges and maybe even a bit arrogant. If sarcasm, political incorrectness and occasional "naughty words" offend you, you may want to move on - but if you're serious about making your Wing Chun WORK, then fill out the fields above and let's get started!